Step 1 identifying input output throughput and outcome elements

The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a logic model and how the framework has been used for planning and evaluation in a primary care PBRN. An evaluation team was formed consisting of the PBRN directors, staff and its board members. After the mission and the target audience were determined, facilitated meetings and discussions were held with stakeholders to identify the assumptions, inputs, activities, outputs, outcomes and outcome indicators. The long-term outcomes outlined in the final logic model are two-fold:

Step 1 identifying input output throughput and outcome elements

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Journal of Advanced Nursing66 12— Aim This paper is a discussion of the derivation of the Nursing Services Delivery Theory from the application of open system theory to large-scale organizations.

Theory linking nursing work, staffing, work environments, and outcomes in different settings is urgently needed to inform management decisions about the allocation of nurse staffing resources in organizations. Seminal works were included. Discussion The healthcare organization is conceptualized as an open system characterized by energy transformation, a dynamic steady state, negative entropy, event cycles, negative feedback, differentiation, integration and coordination, and equifinality.

The Nursing Services Delivery Theory proposes that input, throughput, and output factors interact dynamically to influence the global work demands placed on nursing work groups at the point of care in production subsystems. Implications for nursing The Nursing Services Delivery Theory can be applied to varied settings, cultures, and countries and supports the study of multi-level phenomena and cross-level effects.

Conclusion The Nursing Services Delivery Theory gives a relational structure for reconciling disparate streams of research related to nursing work, staffing, and work environments. The theory can guide future research and the management of nursing services in large-scale healthcare organizations.

Large-scale organizations can be conceptualized as open systems composed of interacting subsystems that selectively import and transform energic inputs from the external environment to produce services and products. What this paper adds The healthcare organization is conceptualized as an open system characterized by energy transformation, a dynamic steady state, negative entropy, event cycles, negative feedback, differentiation, integration and coordination, and equifinality.

This theory situates the work of nursing in the production subsystems of the organization and explicates the division and coordination of nursing work. The theory gives a relational structure that reconciles how nursing work, staffing, and work environment variables contribute to the global work demands placed on nurses at the point of care.

Managers can use this theory as an overarching framework to manage the key components conceptualized to influence the delivery of nursing services at the point of care in organizations. Introduction In many countries, the sustainability and quality of nursing services are threatened by global shortages of healthcare professionals International Council of Nurses As one component of a multifaceted response to this crisis, policy and decision-makers have prioritized the nursing practice environment and organizational performance as key areas for intervention International Council of Nurses Nursing services are generally contracted through an employment relationship.

A challenge in nursing health services research has been the need for a unifying theory to conceptualize and examine the delivery of nursing services Edwardson In the conceptual model for nursing and health policy, Russell and Fawcett identified four levels of focus: The Nursing Services Delivery Theory NSDT addresses the second level of phenomena in this model by examining the effectiveness and efficiency of administrative practices for nursing service delivery subsystems.

Using the strategy of theory derivation, the NSDT gives a theoretical understanding of the nature of an organization, situates the work of nurses in the organizational context, and integrates the design and organization of nursing work.

Examples from the empirical literature are used to illustrate the relational structure the NSDT describes among nursing work, work environment, and staffing variables. Further implications of the theory are discussed. Background Nursing health services research is characterized by a growing need for a coherent theoretical framework that combines clinical, organizational, financial, and outcome variables from a nursing perspective Edwardson Nurse staffing studies often apply traditional nurse staffing indicators to give crude estimates of the amount of nursing resources available for care.

Systems Theory/Inputs-Outputs - Wikibooks, open books for an open world

However, by virtue of their simplicity, nurse staffing indicators also de-contextualize care. In the community, numbers of visits reflect standard times allotted per home visit. Although staffing research examining large administrative data sets in the United States of America USACanada, and the United Kingdom has identified associations between key nurse staffing indicators and patient outcomes at the organizational level Lankshear et al.

Although large database studies allow for comparisons across organizations, evidence on which to re-organize and improve nursing services to varied clinical populations at the point of care is lacking Clarke srmvision.com 6 5.

STEP CONTROLLERS For a sequence like the one in the last section, the best form of PLC is a dedicated STEP controller. These have input and output terminals in the normal way. Inputs and Outputs []. Input is something put into a system or expended in its operation to achieve output or a result.

The information entered into a computer system, examples include: typed text, mouse clicks, etc.

A Logic Model of Performance Inputs, Outputs and Outcomes

Output is the information produced by a system or process from a specific input. Oct 02,  · For example, you may have in the process map a KPOV coming out of ‘step 1’ and the same ‘Variable’ coming into ‘step 2’ of your process map as a KPIV.

Then, if this variable is deemed critical by the team, you end up with the same Variable (KPIV & KPOV) in your I/O Matrix. The outcome is the actual impact and change associated with each output and is typically broken down into short-term (1–3 years), intermediate .

Input is something put into a system or expended in its operation to achieve output or a result. The information entered into a computer system, examples include: typed text, mouse clicks, etc. Output is the information produced by a system or process from a specific input.

Within the context of.

Step 1 identifying input output throughput and outcome elements

Input is defined as any information added into the system from the environment. Throughput is defined as those changes made to the input by the system. Output, of course, is what leaves the system and crosses the boundary back into the environment.

Users Guide - Chapter 9 - Optimization • ProcessModel