The difference between leaders and managers

Share via Email Winston Churchill is an example of a great leader. Hulton Getty Management and leadership practises were once just a subject for TV sitcoms — the Office's David Brent, a master of 'management speak', was celebrated as an example of all that is bad about bosses. But recent scandals, such as those concerning the BBC, NHS and the banking sector, have forced the debate about management and leadership up the agenda. Employers and politicians alike are now asking how our public and private bodies should be organised — and how we can prepare the next generation of leaders.

The difference between leaders and managers

It is a question that has been asked more than once and also answered in different ways. The biggest difference between managers and leaders is the way they motivate the people who work or follow them, and this sets the tone for most other aspects of what they do.

Many people, by the way, are both. They have management jobs, but they realize that you cannot buy hearts, especially to follow them down a difficult path, and so act as leaders too.

What is the Difference Between Management and Leadership? - Management - srmvision.com

Managers have subordinates By definition, managers have subordinates - unless their title is honorary and given as a mark of seniority, in which case the title is a misnomer and their power over others is other than formal authority.

Authoritarian, transactional style Managers have a position of authority vested in them by the company, and their subordinates work for them and largely do as they are told.

Management style is transactionalin that the manager tells the subordinate what to do, and the subordinate does this not because they are a blind robot, but because they have been promised a reward at minimum their salary for doing so.

Work focus Managers are paid to get things done they are subordinates toooften within tight constraints of time and money. They thus naturally pass on this work focus to their subordinates. Seek comfort An interesting research finding about managers is that The difference between leaders and managers tend to come from stable home backgrounds and led relatively normal and comfortable lives.

This leads them to be relatively risk-averse and they will seek to avoid conflict where possible. In terms of people, they generally like to run a 'happy ship'. Leaders have followers Leaders do not have subordinates - at least not when they are leading.

Many organizational leaders do have subordinates, but only because they are also managers. But when they want to lead, they have to give up formal authoritarian control, because to lead is to have followers, and following is always a voluntary activity.

Charismatic, transformational style Telling people what to do does not inspire them to follow you. You have to appeal to them, showing how following you will lead them to their hearts' desire. They must want to follow you enough to stop what they are doing and perhaps walk into danger and situations that they would not normally consider risking.

Leaders with a stronger charisma find it easier to attract people to their cause. As a part of their persuasion they typically promise transformational benefits, such that their followers will not just receive extrinsic rewards but will somehow become better people.

People focus Although many leaders have a charismatic style to some extent, this does not require a loud personality. They are always good with people, and quiet styles that give credit to others and takes blame on themselves are very effective at creating the loyalty that great leaders engender.

Although leaders are good with people, this does not mean they are friendly with them. In order to keep the mystique of leadership, they often retain a degree of separation and aloofness. This does not mean that leaders do not pay attention to tasks - in fact they are often very achievement-focused.

What they do realize, however, is the importance of enthusing others to work towards their vision. Seek risk In the same study that showed managers as risk-averse, leaders appeared as risk-seekingalthough they are not blind thrill-seekers.

When pursuing their vision, they consider it natural to encounter problems and hurdles that must be overcome along the way.

They are thus comfortable with risk and will see routes that others avoid as potential opportunities for advantage and will happily break rules in order to get things done.

The difference between leaders and managers

A surprising number of these leaders had some form of handicap in their lives which they had to overcome. Some had traumatic childhoods, some had problems such as dyslexia, others were shorter than average.

This perhaps taught them the independence of mind that is needed to go out on a limb and not worry about what others are thinking about you. In summary This table summarizes the above and more and gives a sense of the differences between being a leader and being a manager.

This is, of course, an illustrative characterization, and there is a whole spectrum between either ends of these scales along which each role can range. And many people lead and manage at the same time, and so may display a combination of behaviors.The words "leader" and "manager" are often used interchangeably, but they mean two completely different things.

For instance, a manager tells their employees what to do, while a leader encourages. The words "leader" and "manager" are often used interchangeably, but they mean two completely different things.

For instance, a manager tells their employees what to do, while a leader encourages. Oct 09,  · This short video from @ScottWilliams provides 10 clear distinctives to help understand the difference between a manager and a leader.

Thanks . The biggest difference between managers and leaders is the way they motivate the people who work or follow them, and this sets the tone for most other aspects of what they do.

Many people, by the way, are both. May 06,  · What are the significant differences between a leader and a manager? Update Cancel. Answer Wiki. Several articles and blogs asserted the difference between a leader and manager.

But, Warren Bennis composed a list of differences in his book “On Becoming a leader in ”. There are definitely certain differences between being a. Let’s set the record straight. Everyone who is a great leader isn’t necessarily a great manager. And great managers aren’t necessarily great leaders..

So when it comes to the Leaders vs. Managers debate, where do you land?. Here’s a list of 17 traits that separate leadership and management.

Understanding the Differences: Leadership vs. Management | go2HR